Conference Proceedings

DDCO: Discovery of Deep Continuous Options for Robot Learning from Demonstrations

Discovery of Deep Continuous Options (DDCO) learns from demonstrations low-level continuous control skills parametrized by deep neural networks. A hybrid categorical–continuous distribution model parametrizes high-level policies that can invoke discrete options as well continuous control actions, and a cross-validation method tunes the number of options to be discovered. We evaluate DDCO in simulation of a 3-link robot, and in two physical experiments on the da Vinci surgical robot.

Sanjay Krishnan*, Roy Fox*, Ion Stoica, and Ken Goldberg, CoRL 2017
* Equal contribution

DART: Noise Injection for Robust Imitation Learning

DART injects noise during supervisor demonstrations, with a noise level optimized to approximate the error of the robot’s trained policy. This forces the supervisor to demonstrate how to recover from errors, and doesn’t suffer from supervisor burden, computational cost, and training risk as much as on-policy methods. DART learns better policies faster and from fewer demonstrations.

Michael Laskey, Jonathan Lee, Roy Fox, Anca Dragan, and Ken Goldberg, CoRL 2017

Statistical Data Cleaning for Deep Learning of Automation Tasks from Demonstrations

We explore how characterizing supervisor inconsistency and correcting for this noise can improve task performance with a limited budget of data. In a planar part extraction task where human operators provide demonstrations by teleoperating a 2DOF robot, CNN models perform better when trained after error corrections.

Caleb Chuck, Michael Laskey, Sanjay Krishnan, Ruta Joshi, Roy Fox, and Ken Goldberg, CASE 2017

Preprints

Multi-Level Discovery of Deep Options

Existing techniques for automated option discovery do not scale to multi-level hierarchies and to expressive representations such as deep networks. We present Discovery of Deep Options (DDO), a policy-gradient algorithm that discovers parametrized options from a set of demonstration trajectories, and can be used recursively to discover additional levels of the hierarchy. We show that DDO is effective in adding options that accelerate learning in 4 out of 5 Atari RAM environments chosen in our experiments. We also show that DDO can discover structure in robot-assisted surgical videos and kinematics that match expert annotation with 72% accuracy.

Roy Fox*, Sanjay Krishnan*, Ion Stoica, and Ken Goldberg, arXiv, 2017
* Equal contribution